Beauty That Saves, Harmonizes, Unites

Interior of the Church of the Resurrection in St. Petersburg, Russia* Photo by Steve Barker on Unsplash

Last week in his short speech when meeting with the patrons of the arts for the Vatican Museums, Pope Francis offered a few nuggets for reflection for those of us engaged with the arts:

“Throughout history, art has been second only to life
in bearing witness to the Lord.
It was, and remains, a majestic road
allowing us more than by words and ideas
to approach the faith,
because it follows
the same path of faith, that of beauty.
The beauty of art
enriches life and creates communion,
because it unites God, man and creation
in a single symphony.
It connects the past, the present and the future,
and it attracts
– in the same place and with the same gaze –
different and far-off peoples.”

♦›

“Contemplating great art which expresses the faith
helps us rediscover
what truly matters in life.
In leading us both within and above ourselves,
Christian art points us
to the love that created us,
to the mercy which saves us,
and to the hope that awaits us.”

♦›

“In today’s troubled world,
unfortunately so often torn and damaged
by selfishness and the thirst for power,
art represents, perhaps even more than in the past,
a universal need
because it is a source of harmony and peace,
and it expresses the dimension of generosity.”

* Also known as the Church of Our Savior on the Spilled Blood

 

For those in the Boston area, I wanted to let you know that on Saturday, October 20th, our Dedham Bookcenter is hosting a Pauline Author Day, at which several sisters who are authors, as well as myself, will be able to meet, to sign books, and to chat with readers. (I’m so looking forward to this because it’s going to be loads of fun–whether you you love to read, love to write, or are simply interested in the intersection between faith and books!) Here are the details:

 

The Artist is an “apostle of beauty”

In the new film, Pope Francis: A Man of His Word  (directed by one of my favorite filmmakers, Wim Wenders), Pope Francis calls the artist an apostle of beauty. And then he goes on to say that all of us are–or can be–apostles of simple, everyday beauty. He highlights two ways in which that is so…

…but really, you have to watch the movie to find out the rest of what he said (or you can guess in the comments below)!

I’ll be posting a full review of the film shortly, but I just wanted to get a quick word out there about two things:

  1.  Pope Francis: A Man of His Word should be seen by the whole world. It is a father’s video-letter to his children, encouraging us, challenging us, and urging us to be more. We catch a real glimpse of the heart of this Pope: personal, warm, direct, hope-filled and yet full of pathos. In the beautifully filmed segments where Pope Francis speaks directly to us, we can see the pain in his eyes–the pain of a father who sees the suffering that some of his children cause his other children.The film will be available in fewer theaters this week, but it is so worth seeing on the big screen. If, however, you miss it, we will certainly be carrying it at our Pauline Book & Media Centers!You can see the trailer here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOmY8i-uBcYz

  2. This quote from the film (and the entire film) is totally appropriate and fitting for the first-ever “National Creativity Day,” sponsored by ScreenwritingU, which I have found offers quality classes on writing great screenplays. Some great ideas for the day (and beyond), when we struggle with moving forward in our writing/artistic/creative projects!   https://www.facebook.com/NationalCreativityDay/