The Movie To See This Year!

I have always dreamed about writing a full feature film about my favorite saint. So I was prepared for disappointment when I had the opportunity to screen an early version of the soon-to-be released in theaters Paul the Apostle. 

The movie was not what I expected. But I wasn’t disappointed, not a bit!

Here is a list of reasons to watch this film:

  1. You love Saint Paul. (This film is a moving portrayal of the complex, deeply human Pharisee whose life was transformed by his relationship with Christ into Christ’s greatest apostle.)
  2. You don’t like Saint Paul. (Discover an appreciation for why this complex, deeply human, flawed, and grace-filled saint is so great.)
  3. Enter into the drama of the early Church in Rome as it faced the first concentrated persecution.
  4. Deepen your appreciation of Scripture: hear some of the most beloved phrases from Saint Paul’s letters in the context of real-life struggles. The script is entirely faithful to Scripture.
  5. Great acting from both James Faulkner and Jim Cavaziel.
  6. Support a truly Catholic film and Catholic filmmakers who are making strong films, so that they can make more Catholic films. (And the buzz is that odbfilms is starting to look towards their next film!)
  7. Paul the Apostle is a deeply spiritual and religious film, but NOT preachy!
  8. If you haven’t decided what to do for Lent yet, or you want to deepen your Lenten practice in a significant way. (If any saint could be the “patron of Lent,” it would be Saint Paul, whose letters are filled with references to “dying and rising” with Christ.) This movie can frame your Lent and Easter. Use the resources offered by the filmmakers and the American Bible Society to look at significant passages in Saint Paul; and then, at the high point of Lent during Holy Week, or on Easter, go to see the film in the theaters!
  9. The filmmakers competently give us a real sense of Saint Paul, whose life and writings have a vast scope that defies a biopic. (And they do it in less than two hours!)
  10. It’s well worth seeing, from a faith perspective, an artistic perspective, and a film lover’s perspective. (Plus, I’m going to keep talking about this film, so you’ll just have to see it to know what I’m talking about.)
  11. One last reason for writers! If you are a writer, you will love some of the lines in this film!
  12. Paul the Apostle is releasing in at least 35 countries on March 28 (at this date), including Canada.

I could go on, but I’ll stop here.

 

Jim Cavaziel recently about his life of faith in the context of the themes of the film, Paul the Apostle. His is a powerful witness of faith for today’s followers of Christ!

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Invitation: Walk in Christ with the Daughters of Saint Paul!

For the past couple of years, I have been assigned to Pauline Digital (our digital publishing apostolate). My assignment arrived as our approach to the possibilities of a digital presence started to radically shift. Up to this point, I have been doing a bit of everything: creating digital magazines and newsletters, helping out with our online Pauline store, putting up websites, and helping with various technical challenges. In the midst of all of this, I have tried to fit in some deeper writing, too–both for our digital media, and new books. It has been a challenging time, as well as a time of growth for me. And now, we sisters have chosen a particular direction that takes advantage of the wonderful possibilities of the internet so that we can really respond to some of the many needs expressed to us. This month, just in time for the beginning of Lent, we have launched a new digital “initiative.”

What if you could have all the things that you long for—readings, retreats, Stations of the Cross, the Rosary, videos, special prayers and meditations, even spiritual accompaniment, and more—all delivered to your computer, tablet, or smartphone every day? The opportunity to have all the resources you want ready for you to watch, read, pray, and absorb, whenever it’s convenient for you.

My Sisters gives you the opportunity to access exactly the spiritual content that you need anytime that you need it.

You can try it out for only one dollar, less than the cost of a cup of coffee. We’re giving you this special trial run because we’re so confident that once you’re part of My Sisters, you’ll wonder how you ever did without it.

If you are anxious, stressed, or overstretched, and you wonder what holiness can look like in your daily life, visit this online faith community that leads you to more clarity, joy and peace in your daily life. Find spiritual companionship for your journey.

This is a great opportunity to join, not only because you can start a trial month for only $1, but because the spiritual companionship of the sisters and online community–including the mini-conferences, weekly guides, live spiritual accompaniment groups, twice-a-week evening prayer, the live online lectio divina and Rosary, and DIY retreats–can inspire, motivate, guide, and challenge each of us on our walk in Christ.

Up to this point, I have been working in the background, on conferences and retreats. I’m delighted that we’ll be able to offer the first retreat as a Lenten retreat on the theme of living God’s will, offered in early March. While I plan to continue blogging here and at CoAuthorYourLifewithGod.comyou will definitely find me often online here at My Sisters.

Check out these features that My Sisters offers:

Do You Have a “Word” for 2018?

2018 has been filled with the unexpected so far—from new projects to my catching the flu. Because of this, I took a couple hours to brainstorm for a way to re-balance my writing life (and a couple other aspects of my life that I have ignored or not given enough time to). I was delighted to figure out a way to slow down and get back to a regular writing schedule.

One creative way of starting off a new year is to pick a word as a theme for the year. Every new year, I see more people picking their “word” for the year–have you? It’s better yet to notice a word that has “picked you,” especially when the word is from the Scriptures. I have never done this for a whole year, but during every monthly retreat, I try to pick a verse or phrase from the Bible that will inspire me for the whole month.

This year, however, a word “picked me,” as I was praying with the Gospel of John and I thought that I would share it with you. The word is: “Behold.”

According to an online site hosting the RSV translation, “behold” is used in the Bible over 1000 times (1134), and in the NABRE, “behold” is in that translation 104 times. Behold is a wonderful word for the spiritual life and for art, because it encourages us to really look, to see below the surface, to notice those telling details that allow us to appreciate more fully the sacred in our life. (And isn’t that what art is all about—helping us to see?)

The Gospel of John takes its use of the word a step further, encouraging us to go even deeper. The author of John uses “Behold” specifically to invite us to perceive the upside-down-ness of God at work in the world: this Gospel uses “behold” only when speaking of something that upsets human expectations.

“Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world” (John 1) is the context in which the word first “picked” me. And what is more of a paradox than this image of the Lamb of God? The Son of God who is perfect, pure, sinless, innocent, almighty, infinitely good and beautiful, being called a lamb in reference to being offered in sacrifice? We know that many of the Israelites assumed that the Messiah would be a powerful earthly leader but the calls him “the Lamb of God.”

In John 17, Jesus uses this term to speak about his glory, which will be his offering of himself on Calvary in order to save humanity.

In John 19, Pilate tells the crowd to behold their “King,” as a way to mock Jesus—but unknowingly he speaks the truth about the King of all humanity, the King of love who will give his life for us. Also in John 19, Jesus gives Mary and John new identities: Mary becomes the mother of John, and John becomes Mary’s son. We know that here, too, we need to look deeper. Jesus is doing more than entrusting his widowed mother to the care of a young man. He is asking Mary to become the Mother of the Church, and he sees in John the beginning of the Church.

In giving me this word, I feel Jesus inviting me to be more attentive to him in my daily life, to let go of my own agenda and assumptions that are blocking my vision or preventing me from hearing his gentle invitations to do his will.

Long walks has always been a cherished form of exercise for me. At one point, I decided to take up jogging: I could fit more exercise into less time; it was even better for my health than walking, etc. I never became very good at it, but stuck with it for a couple of years. Then one day I went for a long walk. And I realized how much I missed walking. When I jogged, I went too fast to notice everything around me—the flowers, the birds, the color of the sky, etc.—all those things that I enjoyed so much when I walked.

This year, I plan to walk—not jog—through each day. I want to pay attention to the things both great and small in my life that I often ignore or forget about. For me, first of all this means that I need to pay attention to what is going on inside of me—my thoughts and feelings—and then, the people and circumstances around me. For some insight, I am reading a lovely small new book by Frederich Buechner entitled, The Remarkable Ordinary.

My desire to live more contemplatively has been unexpectedly reinforced by  one of our sisters—who is also a dear friend—who spent these first days of 2018 in the hospital and is now in hospice. The smallest details become so significant in these precious days with her—making sure she is comfortable, offering her both the closeness of accompaniment but also the spiritual “space” to prepare herself for heaven. This sister is teaching me how to “behold” God’s presence and blessing in a deeper way, both throughout her life and the years that I have known her, and in these cherished days of her journey to her heavenly homeland.

If you’d like, please share your “word for 2018” in the comments below, or on Facebook!

Blessed Christmas and New Year!

5 (or 6) Reasons To Watch “It’s a Wonderful Life” with Your Family This Christmas!

5 (or 6) Reasons To Watch “It’s a Wonderful Life” with Your Family This Christmas!

On most “favorite Christmas movie” lists, It’s a Wonderful Life takes grand prize. Did you know that It’s a Wonderful Life even made it onto the Vatican’s list of 45 outstanding films during cinema’s first 100 years?

 

 

I didn’t grow up watching It’s a Wonderful Life every year on TV, as so many people have. Having seen it once or twice a long time ago, I thought it would be worth re-watching and perhaps mentioning during the Christmas Special on the Salt + Light Radio Hour. If you have listened to previous Christmas episodes of the Salt + Light Radio Hour, you might know that for the show’s host, Deacon Pedro Guevara-Mann, It’s a Wonderful Life is not just a great Christmas movie. For him, it’s the greatest movie of all time. So I sat down to watch it one more time.

Need I admit it? I was wrong. It’s a Wonderful Life is not just an “okay Christmas movie.” After really watching it, my appreciation for this movie was transformed! It moved up from being somewhere on my “pretty good movie” list to on my top 20 list. And it’s worth way more than a mention; I ended up spending our entire segment discussing it with Deacon Pedro.

It’s a Wonderful Life is a great film for family viewing, for spiritual renewal, and for cinema divina.

You can listen to the Five Spiritual Lessons from It’s a Wonderful Life on the Salt + Light Radio Christmas Hour here, or browse below for a rambling version. And, if you are going to watch It’s a Wonderful Life this Christmas, go ahead and download the free movie guide here on our Pauline website, www.BeMediaMindful.org ! Even just browsing the list of themes or questions might enrich the appreciation you or someone in your family might have for this wonderful film.

It’s a Wonderful Life  available on DVD, streaming.

1946, 2 hrs 10 min

Dir. Frank Capra. Starring Jimmy Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore.

In a nutshell: A great film in every way: artistically, dramatically, and narratively. It’s ironic (but in some ways appropriate to the message of the film) that the lack of appreciation for this movie partially destroyed director Frank Capra’s reputation as a filmmaker.

George Bailey is a good man who becomes desperate and thinks his life is worthless when he thinks he’s lost everything—through no fault of his own. In a miraculous answer to prayer, God sends an angel from heaven to show George how he wrong he is: that his life is indeed wonderful. The film is based on a solid short story (The Greatest Gift written by Philip Van Doren Stern—which you can find online), which is well-written but also gives the film scope to develop. The script itself is well-written, with the themes developing through the events, rather than the dialogue. (In other words, this is not a preachy movie. It is, like all great movies, a story.)

The characters are well-drawn—both as written and as acted. Jimmy Stewart’s George immediately draws us in—in part because of his goodness, but also because of his ordinariness and how he figures things out and then comes to making the right decision for that moment. George is also real in how he struggles when he is faced with sacrificing one of his dreams. (His habit of kicking whatever is nearby is a sure sign he is upset.) If you haven’t seen the film, stop here and continue reading after you’ve watched it. (Spoilers ahead!)

 

Windows to the Soul

So, why does It’s a Wonderful Life make such a great Christmas movie, in that it is entertaining, touching, and reminds us what Christmas is all about?

This is the thematic “lens” I chose for the movie guide: In self-sacrificial love, the Son of God comes to earth to save us, coming as an Infant born to a poor couple in a stable. George Bailey also has a mission to help others, but in the challenges and self-sacrifices he faces, he begins to doubt his personal vocation, his worth, and the meaning of his life. 

Here are a few of my thoughts on the spiritual reminders or spiritual “windows” that It’s a Wonderful Life can help us to see more clearly. I hope that you add more of your favorite reasons for watching this amazing Christmas classic!

1. Image of manliness.

George Bailey offers us a noble image of manliness lived out in the vocation of husband and father—both physical and spiritual fatherhood. Interestingly enough, one of the meanings of the name “Bailey” is “protector” or “guardian.” Following in the footsteps of his father, George makes choices for his family but also for the well-being of the people of the entire community. He doesn’t just protect from evil but also provides for others through his self-sacrificing, kindness and generosity. For me, George’s portrayal of manhood as father and protector is noble—even Saint Joseph-like!

In his Theology of the Body, Pope Saint John Paul II presents us with an understanding of masculinity and femininity that is life-giving. In many ways, George and Mary are examples that powerfully resonate with what St. John Paul has to say.

 

A brief favorite scene: even as George’s life falls apart, he reveals just how tenderly he loves his daughter.

 

2. Power of temptation.

It’s easy to take good people for granted, or to put people on a pedestal. And when things are going well for us, we can take that for granted, too. The best people, even the most generous people, get tempted. George is heroically virtuous throughout most of his life, and yet, every time George chooses for his family instead of himself, or to provide for others over his dreams of travel and education, he really struggles with it. He honestly expresses his anger and resentment, even though he makes the unselfish choice. In the end, these good choices become a source for his temptation to discouragement—and he almost gives over to it.

Today, our culture values individualism and “following your dream” to the point where we do not always consider the needs of others. We don’t talk much about the common good, or the responsibility of the strong to pay attention to those who aren’t as strong.(Who of us would change our career so that the financial well-being of our community would be assured?) It’s so easy to take on an attitude of greed or acquisition. If we aren’t interested in material goods, we seek to acquire other things: experiences, reputation, number of “likes,” etc. It’s a Wonderful Life is a timely reminder of the virtue of unselfish love, and also of the importance of cultivating prayer and the values we cherish most, so that a moment of strong temptation won’t overpower us.

 

3. Spirit of Poverty

In his films, director Frank Capra often treats issues of social justice with a Catholic sensibility. (You can read more about Capra’s Catholic vision in his films in this well-researched article.) George Bailey repeatedly gives up his own dreams for his family and to manage the town’s Building and Loan Company founded by his father, to prevent the wealthy and greedy Mr. Potts taking over the town. With his talents, George makes much of the little resources he has, sometimes inspiring others, too, to help save the town and create simple but homey neighborhoods for immigrants struggling to establish themselves. 

George doesn’t just give up a successful career or making money. He also gives up his dreams of education, travel, his shared dream of a honeymoon with his bride, his life-dream of fulfilling his potential in the way that he envisions. George’s sacrifice of these dreams is his greatest struggle, suffering, and, in the end, becomes his greatest temptation. Focused on what he doesn’t have and what he missed out on, he is no longer able to truly see or appreciate the best part of his life.

And yet, it is poverty of spirit that helps him discover the true treasures in his life. The spirit of poverty is emphasized with the quote under the photo of George’s father in the bank: “All you can take with you is that which you’ve given away.” And Harry, George’s brother for whom George has sacrificed so much, sums up at the end of the film, “A toast…to my big brother, George. The richest man in town!”

George doesn’t just give away money; he shares in the fate of others who are struggling financially; he allows their plight to affect his decisions of how he is going to live his life. He lives the spirit of poverty: a way that helps others and responds creatively to injustice.

 

4. Discouragement and 5. The power of prayer.

(I’m combining lesson 4 & 5 here, so that I can add one more at the end.)

In the “heavenly discussion” early in the film, the angels comment that discouragement is worse than illness. George’s extreme discouragement—it’s not too much to call it despair—is a “spiritual illness” that influences how he sees everything. Doing the right thing becomes “too hard;” a life that holds many sacrifices starts to seem meaningless. As the audience who have witnessed George’s life, we clearly see that these thoughts are temptations. One of the startling moments in the film for me was one I’d forgotten: when George thinks that God’s answer to his prayer is a punch! I was startled by it because I have often felt the same way. Out of fear and weariness, I give in to discouragement and can no longer see the good in my own life.

Desperate as he is, George prays for help. As a vibrant, essential part of his community, George’s crisis is recognized by others and they pray for him, too. The angel Clarence uses some Dickens-like creativity to help George overcome the power of this seductive temptation.

When Clarence claims to be the answer to George’s prayer, it came to me to wonder how often others are answers to my prayers. When we are truly open to doing God’s will, when we sincerely pray “Thy will be done” in the Our Father, then we too, can be God’s answer to a prayer. This movie is very Christian in how it likes to turn things “upside down”: God does answer prayers, but in his own time, in his own way. God sees differently than we do. The little, ordinary person—the little ones of the Gospel—the ones for whom, like Mary, their weakness is God’s strength—are not necessarily so little in God’s eyes. How can we be the answer to someone’s prayer today?

 

6. Meaning and Giftedness of Life

The meaning of life—that every life has meaning, and that every life is wonderful—is the theme of film. Clarence’s line sums it up well: “Each man’s life touches so many other lives, and when he isn’t around he leaves an awful hole, doesn’t he?” (Or, as Galadriel says in Lord of the Rings: “Even the smallest person can change the course of the future.”)

What is impressive to me is that, despite his goodness, on some level George hasn’t understood this. Despite his kind generosity, his family, his achievements, and his great sacrifices for others, when George gradually starts to lose his faith, he discounts them all. It seems that he has been blind to the gift of his personal vocation and the true meaning of his life. Perhaps George never truly grasped the meaning of his life; perhaps he has always clung in some way to the dreams he thought he renounced. He simply dismisses or forgets the many lives he has saved or transformed, even discounting the friendships that mean the most to him.

Each of us carries a mental image of what success means, and we might, like George, feel like a failure if we don’t achieve that image. But is that “success” our vocation? Is it “success” that makes us truly happy? 

For me, the question to ask myself at the end of this movie is, “What makes my life wonderful, here and now?” This is a great question to share on as a family after watching this film. 

Recognizing the giftedness of our own lives doesn’t just make us grateful to be alive; it gifts us with joy and happiness, because we recognize how God is at work in our lives, how God continues to save us and love us, blessing us and gracing us.

You can download the free movie guide here, courtesy of the Pauline Center for Media Studies.

Themes found in It’s a Wonderful Life: Sacrificial love, life-giving love, meaning in life, personal vocation, manliness, spirit of poverty, Christmas, giftedness of life, family, salvation, gratitude, power of prayer, discouragement, perseverance, social justice.

The Star: the Christmas Story through the Eyes of Talking Animals

The Star, which opened wide in theaters on November 17th, is a playful yet respectful approach to the story of Jesus’ birth for little ones. In trying to do a bit too much, the story wanders off-course midway, but overall The Star is a competent animated version of the story of the birth of Jesus, both entertaining and accessible to children.

The Story

The Star is mostly told from the viewpoint of a young donkey, who longs for adventure and to do something “big” in his life. The donkey, who comes to be called Bo (a nickname for Boaz), escapes from his owner and hides in the yard of the newly-married Mary and Joseph. Bo meets Mary and is delighted by her gentle understanding and care. Mary seems to have a special affinity for all of God’s creation, and she adopts Bo despite Joseph’s protests.

Bo goes back and forth between trying to follow his own long-cherished dream of adventure (to work in the royal caravan) and his loyalty to Mary and Joseph. The entire second act of the film follows Bo’s desperate attempts to rescue Mary from the assassin whom Herod sends after the three Wise Men. This middle part of the story feels quite convoluted by Bo’s changing his mind several times about what he will do, and the various complications that ensue. The plot further falters because of the heavy-handed use of several Christmas carols, when the action simply stops. But the wandering plot has a purpose, as Bo learns from every mistake he makes and recommits to helping the Holy Family, whether his service is appreciated or not. 

The filmmakers rose to the challenge of remaining true to the essence of the story of Jesus’ birth, all the while interweaving the fictional adventures of talking animals. From a Christian perspective, it is disappointing and somewhat contradictory that, in a children’s story about the birth of the King of Peace, both high points of the protagonist’s story are fights.

The visual design and animation of The Star is delightful and serve the story well to help connect the children with the characters.

The Characters

The tension between Bo’s longing for adventure and his growing attachment to Mary form the core of Bo’s character development. The outstanding character in the story is Mary, the expectant mother of Jesus. She is lovably human and warm, but also clearly possesses—and exercises—great faith and love. Joseph, too, is appealing and manly. He really struggles with the idea of being chosen to be the foster father of the Son of God. Instead of showing Mary and Joseph as always calm and serene, the film shares several moments where Mary and Joseph react in a vulnerable and understandable way to the difficult circumstances they face. Their relationship and their encouragement to each other to have faith through difficulty is a joy to watch.

Bo is a hardheaded big-hearted donkey with a loyal friend in the not-so-practical dancing dove, Dave. Bo and Dave provide much of the enjoyable humor in the story. Bo’s growth in faithfulness, love, and discovering what is truly important in life might be a bit too complete by the end, but his growth and his adventures go hand-in-hand.

Several of the supporting characters are poorly drawn caricatures that fail to serve the drama or the humor, with particularly limited, overly-simple dialogue. The three camels who carry the wise men are often not funny, but irritating and even problematic: their attempts at humor included calling others by derogatory names. Name-calling is not a matter for humor in a children’s film. In one instance (which was unfortunately repeated), the name-calling might be construed as disrespectful to Christ and the Jewish people.

Windows to the Soul

In many ways, The Star is a wonderfully imaginative tale for children, set in the context of Jesus’ birth. The talking animals give kids an easy way to identify with the characters in the story, especially Mary, whose affinity with all creation—including the animals, no matter how humble—is a beautiful thread running through the film.

It’s hard to know at what age a child would most appreciate The Star. (This is true of many films, and why it can be so important for parents to watch movies with their children, and make sure to discuss it afterward.) Many moments in the film (especially the humor) seem to indicate that the film is for young children—toddlers up to 5 or 6 years old. But the super-scary assassin (perhaps a less-violent stand-in for the slaughter of the Holy Innocents?) could be problematic, especially as the tension of his threat grows throughout the film. And older children will enjoy the antics of Bo and Dave, as well as receive insights into the journey of faith taken by Mary and Joseph on their way to Bethlehem.

However, in a couple of ways, the script needed stronger writing. Name-calling portrayed as humor, fighting used for the “big scene” at the end of a film about the birth of Jesus, and some overly simplistic dialogue about “being good” and “being bad,” plus the fact that Bo’s adventures and growth sometimes overshadow the story of the Holy Family, means that the film could have been much stronger in telling the story of the birth of Jesus. But when we remember that the viewpoint of the film consistently stays with the animals—primarily with Boaz, the donkey—The Star becomes quite a remarkable and delightful retelling of the Christmas story.

Note for Parents and Teachers: Affirm Films has made some wonderful resources available to use before and after watching the film. Go to the movie’s site: http://www.thestarmovie.com/ click on Menu and then click on the Resources tab. From brochures, coloring and activity pages, to a family discussion guide (downloadable for free), this is a great opportunity to spend time with your children on the true meaning of Christmas.

You can listen to my review online on Salt + Light Radio here. 

Top Communication Tips from the Saints!

Top Communication Tips from the Saints!

Have you ever had something hard to say to someone, and had trouble figuring out how to say it?

There are saints for that! Yes, we can find inspiration for what and how we communicate well beyond Dale Carnegie (although he has some great communication tips too). Below are some tips from a few saints, future saints, and great Catholics!

Seven Tips for Communicating Well from St. Ignatius

Rebecca Ruiz, in this succinct, well-written article, inspired the idea for my blogpost! I hope to read more of Saint Ignatius for myself, but my favorite tip of the seven that Rebecca picks out is #2: Create environments of “greater love than fear.” This tip doesn’t just work for conversation, but it resonates with my experience of working with actors. When I pick the right person for the role, and then create a safe atmosphere in which the actor can take risks and be vulnerable in his or her performance, then I invariably get a performance that is authentic.

In a classic blogpost, How To Give a Talk like Fulton Sheen, one of my favorite communicators, Brandon Vogt, shares the tips that Venerable Fulton Sheen casually offered in conversation.  Several of his tips are similar to the tips of St. Ignatius.

Saint Francis de Sales is patron of writers and journalists for many reasons. But here is a new reason for me! In his Treatise on the Love of God (Book II, Chapter IV), which I am just getting around to reading, St. Francis speaks of both Creation and the Incarnation as God communicating himself in love to us! This is foundational in communication theology, and I never expected to find it in Francis de Sales from the 18th century. Here is a short quote:

God knew from all eternity that he could make an innumerable multitude of creatures with divers perfections and qualities, to whom he might communicate himself, and considering that amongst all the different communications there was none so excellent as that of uniting himself to some created nature, in such sort that the creature might be engrafted and implanted in the divinity, and become one single person with it, his infinite goodness, which of itself and by itself tends towards communication, resolved and determined to communicate himself in this manner. So that, as eternally there is an essential communication in God by which the Father communicates all his infinite and indivisible divinity to the Son in producing him and the Father and the Son together producing the Holy Ghost communicate to him also their own singular divinity; – so this sovereign sweetness was so perfectly communicated externally to a creature, that the created nature and the divinity, retaining each of them its own properties, were notwithstanding so united together that they were but one same person.

For years I have wanted to study St. John Paul II’s applied theology of communication. Someone else has begun this work, surprisingly using Ecclesia de America as the example of John Paul’s communication. Dr. Christine Mugridge and Sr. Marie Gannon, FMA, published a curriculum text, John Paul II: Development of a Theology of Communication, which I look forward to reading. This article introduces the text, but a shorter, more accessible introduction is here:

 

My very favorite works on communication (in addition to ALL of the papal Messages for World Communications Days 1967-ongoing), are the classic texts of SVD Father Franz-Josef Eilers, which I wrote about back in a 2011 blogpost. If you are interested in pastoral communication, evangelization, the spirituality and/or theology of communication, all of his books are awesome.

And finally, of course, Pope Francis has some very practical, down-to-earth advice on communication, which I have been able to find most easily in his talks on the themes of evangelization, communication, and family life.